A Garden in Transition

It won’t be long until summer starts giving way to fall. I could feel it this morning when I went out to water the garden – that little nip in the early morning air that wasn’t present just a week ago.

I’m starting to think about our fall and winter garden and planning to go through my seed packets to see what I have. None of the local nurseries sells fall garden plants which is a shame. Our climate here (zone 9) is mild enough to have a garden year round and I plan on taking advantage of that this year!

Even though I’m in fall planning mode…there are a few summer stragglers that keep filling the veggie drawers in the fridge. The picture below shows some of our goodies – most of which I picked a couple of days ago except for the 3 1/2 gallons of elderberries which were given to us by some friends. I popped them into the freezer and will be turning them into jelly when the weather cools down. I love having friends who enjoy the same sort of stuff we are into (canning, etc.). It’s fun to trade jams & jellies and to share the abundance of our garden with others.

garden harvest

So what’s going on in the garden right now?

Our corn has ears that are just starting to swell. I can’t wait to roast some as soon as it’s ready! This will be our first successful corn harvest at this house. We tried growing it when the kids were little, but it was a total flop. It got some horrible corn disease and was all stunted and the ears were inedible. We are much more experienced gardeners now (with tons more to still learn!) and thankfully, this year our corn looks great. Otter took this picture at the end of last week. Even in just the last few days, the ears of corn have grown bigger (and fatter).

corn stalks

Our tomato harvest is winding down (although there are a few of them like the cherry tomato plants that are still cranking tomatoes out). The pomegranates are getting bigger and our oranges are taking on the first blush of color. All of the stone fruit is finished and we aren’t watering the those trees as often to help them harden off before the cold hits.

The granny smith apples are ROTTING on the tree. We still don’t have that tree figured out and fixed. First, I thought it had fire blight. I sprayed it once this spring and it actually made bunches of apples (last year it never got past the blossom clusters because they turned brown & rotted). This year it made apples, but they all got brown spots that soon spread and turned the apples brown. I don’t think they will be salvageable (although there might be a few way up high that are unaffected). UGH. I have so much more to learn about orchard trees. I’m going to spray it this fall and put it on a schedule of spraying (copper). Hopefully we’ll be able to cure it at some point and get an apple harvest in the future. Our Honeycrisp apple appears to O.K. but it’s still so small it only made 2 apples this year. Still, the one I ate was so delicious and juicy and perfect. It’s an aptly named apple as it does have slight tones of sweet honey in the flavor. I can’t wait for that tree to grow bigger.

Otter’s pepper plants are exploding with peppers all of the sudden. It’s as if the excessive heat this summer (100+ degree temps) kept them from producing and now that it’s cooled down just a smidge, they are making up for lost time and seem to be healthier too.  I had planned on pickling some of the pepper harvest but it turns out I bought the WRONG stuff for it. I need pickling salt and instead I bought some pickling lime. Our local store didn’t have any pickling salt so it looks like I’ll have to order some from Amazon. Pickling salt is just pure sodium chloride (salt) without any additives. The additives (anti-caking agents) in regular salt can make the pickling brine cloudy and can also, from what I’ve read, make pickled items turn a slightly purple/off color. You can read more about it here. Ah well, I keep learning about all of this.

We’ve have so many grapes we hardly knew what to do with them all! We’ve picked and eaten them all summer (and given away tons too). I even let the fat robins eat their fill because they hardly made a dent in our harvest despite making it a frequent breakfasting spot. They are so cute when they hop up from the ground to pluck grapes off the vine. I can’t bear to chase them off, lol. We still have some grapes hanging around, but a lot of them have started to dry or spoil.  Still, there are enough to tide us over for at least another couple of weeks or more. I’ll be turning some into raisins with my dehydrator before the week is done.

Anyway, it’s almost time to get our fall garden into gear. I’m thinking about planting things like carrots, cabbage, greens, lettuce, fall peas, green onions and ?? It’s going to be a bit of an experiment to see what works as the weather changes but well worth the work for all of the money it saves us. I love my garden and love learning how to better feed my family with it!

Being a Keeper of the Home

Keeper of the home

When I was younger, I did not enjoy “domestic” type jobs around the house. I thought they were boring and had to force myself (for the most part) to do them. I had a rebellious attitude and heart toward many of the old-fashioned stereotypes of women.  Why should I be the one stuck with the laundry when I had been changing diapers all day and chasing toddlers? Why should I bother to mend pants when I can just go out and buy another pair? So what if the living room wasn’t tidy…I’d been homeschooling the kids all day. Was I a maid too? While I loved taking care of my children, I did not love taking care of my home.

Now that I’m older, I’ve grown into an entirely different mindset. I LIKE taking care of my home. I love learning all of the skills I neglected or trudged through during my younger years. I’ve found that the closer I’ve grown to God, the more I’ve grown to enjoy the role He created for me as a woman and all of the “jobs” that entails. When I was younger, I was often disorganized and messy. Now my home is a place of peace and order (usually, lol). God is not a God of chaos. Everything in the universe has its place and purpose. Our homes need to reflect the God we serve.

I find when I do things His way that I’m filled with a contentment and direction that was entirely unknown to me years ago. I wish I had known then what I know now. Doing things God’s way is not always easier, but it’s always the best way. It’s also the only way to put yourself in a position to receive the full measure of the blessings he wants to pour over you and your family. I can’t tell you how many things, even little things that are just wants and not needs, that God has taken care of and given us. The more I pursue His way, the more I see Him working in our lives.

There are no excuses why a healthy wife and mother can’t take care of her home. Don’t tell me it’s because you’ve been teaching the kids all day (been there, done that) or that you are tired (I am too!), or that you don’t know how to do something (learn!) or the kids keep wrecking it all behind you (train them not to). If you are struggling with keeping your home, you CAN train yourself (and your kids) to do what needs to be done.

The first step is nurturing the right heart & attitude concerning your daily tasks and the things you still need to learn. I list this as the FIRST step because if you don’t have the right heart about something, you will never improve in the long-term. If you feel disaffected having to pick up socks off the floor your husband threw down for the 256th time, you aren’t going to make any progress. Why let it bother you? What’s faster and more conducive to happiness and contentment? Picking them up or making a big deal out of it in your mind and letting it fester in your soul all day? You have to look at being a wife and mom as your job. What sort of review would a boss write about your “work performance” lately? ;-) It’s a gift to get to stay home. It may not be super popular for me to say this, but I believe being a stay-at-home wife and mom is not only a gift, but also part of God’s design for the family. Start working on a grateful & cheerful attitude.

The second step is starting with something – no matter how small! Just keep going from one small step to another. Work on building new habits and learning new things. When I was just starting this journey, one of the things I had to learn was not to step over something on the floor, but to pick it up and put it away, right then and there. It was a small thing, but it made a big difference. Now I can’t stand to have anything on my floor, lol. It drives me nuts whereas before I could ignore it all day.

The third step is to get rid of things and start finding a place for everything. If everything has a place, it’s much easier to keep things clean. There are lots of blogs and websites that have terrific ideas on how to organize everything from closets to under your kitchen sink. Pick one thing to start with and go from there.

The fourth step is to LEARN! What is it that you can learn to be a better wife, mother, house-keeper, etc.? Here are some things I’ve learned or am learning to save money or contribute to a better lifestyle, make my husband happy and other similar reasons that all have to do with being a keeper at home:

  • Gardening
  • Cleaning and organizing – I’m often on the lookout for new and better ways of doing things and work to keep my home environment attractive and peaceful.
  • Sewing – I’m JUST starting to learn how to sew so I can mend my husband’s pants, make gifts and create things for our home.
  • Canning & food preservation
  • Cooking from scratch – I’ve never been a great cook, but am hoping to change that. I’ve started learning new recipes and am trying new things like making yeast rolls instead of buying them, etc.
  • Couponing – I’ve saved as much as 35% on some of our shopping trips.

What do YOU need or want to learn? :-)

The fifth step is to never quit and just keep going. If you fail, don’t beat yourself up. Just do better the next day. After a while things will fall into place.

It’s never too late to become a GREAT (and happy / contented) keeper of your home!

1 Timothy 5:14 – I will therefore that the younger women marry, bear children, guide the house, give none occasion to the adversary to speak reproachfully.

Titus 2:5 – To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed.

 

Geography Curriculum is Finished!

I’ve been in a frenzy working on my geography curriculum and am happy to announce that it’s finished! I may still add new materials as I come across them or tweak a little this or that, but it’s ready-to-go for those of you who would like to use it.

Click on the picture below to check it out!

Geography curriculum

This is what I did today…

Yesterday I pulled a ripe peach off of our tree and realized it was time to pick and process peaches! This is the first year the peaches actually look nice instead of all deformed or small, so instead of turning them into jam, I’m canning most of them. :-)

This is what they looked like this morning when I went to pick them. Some were so big they looked like apples.peaches on the tree

I couldn’t reach them all with the stepladder, so I left some on the tree – but here is the haul from this morning. It doesn’t look like a ton, but that’s almost 3 full 5 gallon buckets worth. I looked it up and a 5 gallon bucket is a little over half a bushel…so we netted approx. 1 and 1/2 bushels, so far. That’s something like 72 pounds! One bushel is supposed to net 18-24 quarts of canned peaches. It will be interesting to see how accurate that is when I’m done.

peaches

 

Here is the finished product – my first 3 jars!

canned peaches

 

I tried a raw pack recipe this time (that’s why the peaches are floating a bit in the syrup). Later this week, when I process some more, I’m going to try a hot pack recipe. The hot pack method is supposed to make the peaches shrink up a little before packing them in the jar so they will fill up more of a jar and float less.

I made these with a medium syrup but I’m curious to try a honey syrup too!

Here’s a link from the National Center for Home Food Preservation that explains both methods.

Canning is so easy and so rewarding! I’m really excited to see the new pressure canner I ordered. It should be arriving later this week and will make it so I can finally can things like spaghetti sauce!

Guest Hollow Geography Curriculum

homeschool geography curriculum

Coming soon! I started working on a geography curriculum that I hope will be finished in a couple of weeks for the new school year.  I’ll post an update here on my blog when it’s finished.

P.S. The dog in the picture above is Beowulf. He’s a character in the book I’m working on that hopefully will be finished by spring of 2015!

Japanese, Russian and Writing Tutoring Services

I posted awhile back about my daughter’s e-tutoring site (email correspondence or Skype lessons).

 http://hannahstutori….wordpress.com/

 She asked me to let you all know that there are new options like advanced Japanese and Russian that are now being offered as she is partnering with some of her native speaking friends. The gentleman who is teaching Russian is a really brilliant and amazing young man (college student).

 She is also offering options for writing where she will either help edit, critique and grade assignments from any writing curriculum or will assign writing assignments and help students edit their work until they have a finished product. Another option is a pay-per-paper editing fee.

 The courses are for any age/grade and even adults. :-)

 If you use the code GUEST you can get 5% off of a course and there is also a 5% discount for early registration which ends tomorrow!!

 I hope this is helpful to someone. She is really a very talented teacher and loves working with students.

For Those of You Interested in Avancemos Spanish

It was brought to my attention that some of you are having difficulty getting a response when trying to get the homeschool discount on the Avancemos Spanish program I recently posted about. Here is another way to get some assistance and the free code for a 20% discount and free shipping.

Go to www.hmhco.com/homeschool. If you click on the item you are interested in, it will take you to a homeschool contact form to fill out.

You can find additional contact information for the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt representative Shannon Cullip via her website by clicking here.

I don’t know why they can’t just make it easy and let us homeschoolers load up an online shopping cart like everywhere else, but it’s worth the extra trouble as Avancemos is an excellent program.

Summer School ;-)


drugsYesterday Otter started a new series of drug and alcohol identification and enforcement classes. CHP officers are teaching the Explorers all about the effects of drugs and alcohol, how to recognize intoxication, alcohol blood levels, when arrests can be made and so on. Otter’s learning that even if a person doesn’t necessarily look it, s/he can still be legally intoxicated, the blood chemistry behind all of that and smaller clues to look for – with those who can “hold their liquor”. He loves these classes and said he had to take a TON of notes. This week they covered alcohol. Next week they’ll be covering some drugs. He got to go on some ride-alongs recently too where he wrote some tickets for speeding and was instructed in many other law enforcement skills during the officer’s shift with the various things they ran into.

I think it’s important for homeschooled kids to get classroom time in some form or fashion. Otter’s Explorer classes have helped to fill that need – with a multitude of experiences including “pop” spelling quizzes, taking notes, tests, and teamwork.

He also got quite a bit of class time in one of his camps this year. He spent hours working on earning merit badges in First Aid (where he learned CPR and other valuable skills), Citizenship in the World and Emergency Preparation. He now has almost all the merit badges he needs to start working on becoming an Eagle Scout.

citizenship_in_the_world_lg emergency_preparedness_lg first_aid_lg

He added to his swimming skills this summer too. I am so proud that my boy who USED to be afraid of the water is quite the fish and that he was working with a younger boy who is afraid of swimming – trying to help him overcome his fear with the understanding and patience of someone who’s been there and done that. ;-)

Otter has been in a lot of leadership roles this summer. Earlier this summer he was Den Chief for the Cub Scouts and helped teach & lead a group of boys during Cub Scout Day Camp. He’s also been working as Senior Patrol Leader for his group of scouts. When he started Boy Scouts, he was one of the youngest scouts. Now he’s one of the “big boys” and helps teach (and corral, lol) the younger boys. His Scoutmaster has talked to him about moving up as a jr. assistant scout master in the future. He’ll be helping out in Vacation Bible School later this summer too.

I love watching Otter grow and mature as such a responsible young man who is involved in a lot of positive activities that allow him to interact with many different mentors and law enforcement officers who put in hours of teaching time as well as kids of all ages and backgrounds.

Switching Spanish Curriculum

I planned on continuing with Rosetta Stone for Spanish, but I found a more complete curriculum that will work better for Otter’s learning style. Rosetta Stone just doesn’t cut it for us when it comes to helping us understand Spanish in more depth. We both could understand enough to click on the correct boxes (most of the time), but weren’t really understanding the grammar or even what specific words mean, even though we could kind of figure them out in context.

We are going to be using Avancemos, which is by Holt McDougal and available via a special price if you order the homeschool package (more details on how to get that at the end of the post).

Here’s what we are ordering:

9780547858654 Level 1 Avancemos Homeschool Kit $96.75 – 20% (homeschool discount) = $77.40

For that price I’m getting the print student edition as well as the student and teacher digital access codes.

The access codes give you access to the digital textbooks (both student and teacher editions), all the teacher resources and answers, student worksheets, tests, videos, audio…There is a TON of stuff that is available for this program. I’ve included some screenshots below to give you an idea of what you get.

The online student text has all the video and audio integrated right into the text itself (just a click away) as well as self-checking chapter activities sprinkled throughout the online pages. I love that you can click on the audio icons as well as all the words highlighted in blue to hear them (no guessing when it comes to pronunciation)!

spanish curriculum

 

The online student text has a tab where all the unit resources are available at a click. There are animated grammar lessons, flashcards, self-check quizzes, interactive games and TONS of worksheets (all the answers are included in the teacher resources).

spanish2

Here’s an example of one of the interactive games – a crossword puzzle you can fill out online.

spanish5

Another online game:

spanish10

Worksheets have numerous pages of varying activities to practice what’s being learned in the text:spanish3

There are also interactive online “worksheets” for additional practice:

spanish8

There is even a “at home-tutor” option that walks you through practice materials step-by-step.

The teacher’s resources contain even more printables and activities to help your students learn Spanish like conversation cards:

spanish7

Clipart & flashcard printables:

spanish6

 

There is so much more. I couldn’t fit all of the teacher resources in one screenshot, but you can get an idea of what is available by taking a look at this:

 

spanish9

 

Each arrow and plus sign leads to a drop down menu of more choices. There are more things than you will ever need to use. I love having so many options. If we understand a chapter, we’ll be able to move on more quickly. If there is something we don’t get, we’ll be able to dig in and stay awhile. ;-)

Emily used Holt’s German program with great success. Avencemos has even more features than her program did so I think it will work out great for us. The homeschool pricing makes it even more attractive and the multiple resources & modes of learning make it more valuable to us as a Spanish program. It’s structured in such a way that I believe we will be successful with it, even though neither of us speaks hardly any Spanish.

In order to get the special package price you must be either a homeschooler, independent study or charter school family. If you meet those requirements you can contact Shannon Cullip (shannoncullip [at sign] gmail.com) or call toll free: 855-386-9297 option 1.

Happy homeschooling!